Ocean Acidification in Africa

Major food fish in African coastal communities rely on healthy coral reefs that could disappear in an acidifying ocean

Ocean Acidification in Africa

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For African consumers, fish and other fish products make up around 18% of all animal protein intake. (…) Fisheries and aquaculture currently contribute USD $24 billion to the economy in Africa, employing more than 12 million people across the continent.

International organizations have been hard at work building ocean acidification capacity in Africa and providing excellent knowledge and resources for policymakers and resource managers. Ocean Acidification Africa (OA-Africa) is a group of concerned scientists seeking to advance the study of ocean acidification for the benefit of informed policy and adaptive strategies in African coastal waters.

This “Ocean Acidification in Africa” document has been prepared in anticipation of the 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26) in Glasgow, Scotland on 31 October-12 November 2021. It calls for unique local, national, and regional ocean acidification research and provides recommendations for a Pan-African response.

Read the full document here.

The Ocean Acidification Africa Hub is supported by Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network, The Ocean Foundation, International Atomic Energy Agency-Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and Future Earth Coasts.